Posts Tagged: #disability

Denver’s One-Lung Army: Disease, Disability, and Debility in a Frontier City

By Jacqueline Antonovich In 1879 the famous showman, P.T. Barnum joked that, “Coloradoans are the most disappointed people I ever saw. Two-thirds of them come here to die and they can’t do it.”[1] Barnum was referring to Colorado’s growing reputation

Denver’s One-Lung Army: Disease, Disability, and Debility in a Frontier City

By Jacqueline Antonovich In 1879 the famous showman, P.T. Barnum joked that, “Coloradoans are the most disappointed people I ever saw. Two-thirds of them come here to die and they can’t do it.”[1] Barnum was referring to Colorado’s growing reputation

The Window Operation: Hope through Surgery

By Jaipreet Virdi-Dhesi “[Dr. Lempert] reached not quite as high as my shoulder. We liked each other on sight. He had read Cotton in My Ears and enjoyed it, he told me, as we stood talking when the meeting was

The Window Operation: Hope through Surgery

By Jaipreet Virdi-Dhesi “[Dr. Lempert] reached not quite as high as my shoulder. We liked each other on sight. He had read Cotton in My Ears and enjoyed it, he told me, as we stood talking when the meeting was

Abilities first? Institutions for disabled children in Victorian and Edwardian Britain

By Lesley Hulonce In 2001, Douglas Baynton observed that ‘disability is everywhere in history, once you begin looking for it, but conspicuously absent from the histories we write’.[1] Of course, since then, historians have begun to fill these lacunae, and

Abilities first? Institutions for disabled children in Victorian and Edwardian Britain

By Lesley Hulonce In 2001, Douglas Baynton observed that ‘disability is everywhere in history, once you begin looking for it, but conspicuously absent from the histories we write’.[1] Of course, since then, historians have begun to fill these lacunae, and

Family Emotional Economies and Disability at Birth

By Barbara Brookes As a so-called ‘obstetric antique’, having my second child at 35 (in 1990) and my third at nearly 41, I was twice offered, and twice took, the opportunity to have amniocentesis. Both times I felt like a

Family Emotional Economies and Disability at Birth

By Barbara Brookes As a so-called ‘obstetric antique’, having my second child at 35 (in 1990) and my third at nearly 41, I was twice offered, and twice took, the opportunity to have amniocentesis. Both times I felt like a