Posts Tagged: #historyofemotions

(M)eat your friends

By Sarah Moon This post is part of the series ‘What Should I Eat? Why?’ commissioned in collaboration with H-Net Nutrition by series editors Kristen Ann Ehrenberger and Lisa Haushofer. Posts will appear simultaneously on both sites. Please visit and

(M)eat your friends

By Sarah Moon This post is part of the series ‘What Should I Eat? Why?’ commissioned in collaboration with H-Net Nutrition by series editors Kristen Ann Ehrenberger and Lisa Haushofer. Posts will appear simultaneously on both sites. Please visit and

Migraine Fears

By Katherine Foxhall All the fascinating discussions of emotion on REMEDIA – particularly Danielle Ofri’s recent reflection ‘On the Raw Fear of Being a Patient’ – made me think about the role of fear in the history of illness. It occurred

Migraine Fears

By Katherine Foxhall All the fascinating discussions of emotion on REMEDIA – particularly Danielle Ofri’s recent reflection ‘On the Raw Fear of Being a Patient’ – made me think about the role of fear in the history of illness. It occurred

The Emotional Literacy of Empire: Memoirs and Medicine in the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857

By Sam Goodman The Sepoy Rebellion of 1857, for many years known as the ‘Indian Mutiny’, held a special place in the history of colonial India.[1] The events that transpired across the country’s central plains over the summer of 1857,

The Emotional Literacy of Empire: Memoirs and Medicine in the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857

By Sam Goodman The Sepoy Rebellion of 1857, for many years known as the ‘Indian Mutiny’, held a special place in the history of colonial India.[1] The events that transpired across the country’s central plains over the summer of 1857,

Family Emotional Economies and Disability at Birth

By Barbara Brookes As a so-called ‘obstetric antique’, having my second child at 35 (in 1990) and my third at nearly 41, I was twice offered, and twice took, the opportunity to have amniocentesis. Both times I felt like a

Family Emotional Economies and Disability at Birth

By Barbara Brookes As a so-called ‘obstetric antique’, having my second child at 35 (in 1990) and my third at nearly 41, I was twice offered, and twice took, the opportunity to have amniocentesis. Both times I felt like a

Honest Darwin

By Kate Womersley There were times when Charles Darwin found it difficult to trust his own species. Writing to the philosopher, William Graham, in 1881, he described how “horrid doubt always arises whether the convictions of man’s mind, which has

Honest Darwin

By Kate Womersley There were times when Charles Darwin found it difficult to trust his own species. Writing to the philosopher, William Graham, in 1881, he described how “horrid doubt always arises whether the convictions of man’s mind, which has